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Fostering Potential

Fostering Potential is funded by the Sir John Cass Foundation and the British & Foreign School Society, with the aim of supporting the educational outcomes of children who are currently in foster care.  This programme builds on the successful London Fostering Achievement programme and also on work carried out under the

Improving Educational Outcomes

Why do we need to support the education of fostered children and young people?

The Fostering Network believes that it is vital to support the education of fostered children and young people because the available evidence shows that children who are looked after generally have lower attainment at school than other children.  

Review - Educating Children and Young People in Care

Review

This book argues that foster homes should be educational in the widest sense and that schools should be caring. It is a useful guide to how this can be achieved, providing statistical evidence, case studies and practical support for foster carers, social workers and teaching staff.

The three authors argue that social pedagogy has much to offer. They assert that the everyday environment is just as important as academic spaces as a place for learning. 

School attendance and punctuality

About the issue

It is a legal requirement for children and young people to attend school regularly and punctually. Time out of the classroom may mean missing important lessons. The first ten minutes of a class would usually cover the introduction to an activity, and once missed may disrupt the rest of the child’s schedule.

Truancy can have a negative impact on a child and/or young person’s future. Truancy matters because:

Education: Helping young people succeed

Yvonne Kielt is a development worker for the Fostering Achievement scheme in Northern Ireland and in this blog describes how she has seen the positive influence the programme has had.

A second chance at an education

Hollie is a care leaver from Northern Ireland. in this blog she talks about her experiences of foster care and how it has transformed her life.

Talking about Higher Education and the future

‘We cannot make them succeed, but we can provide them with what they need to make success possible. We can give them a home and an environment that will help them to achieve their best. For children and young people to really achieve, they need to feel proud of themselves. We can keep reminding them every day of how brilliant they are.’ Linda, foster carer

Always trying to be a better person

I am Yacouba Traore. I am from the Ivory Coast and I have lived in the UK for about six years. I arrived alone in England as a 16-year-old asylum seeker following the murder of my parents who were political activists in my country.

​Mountains to molehills

When our child first arrived six months ago he could not speak a word of English. He was completely silent and understood very little of what we tried to communicate. He wore a permanent look of mistrust and uncertainty which made his features brittle and often impenetrable.

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